Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui 16: stitching the berries on the front panel

I am currently stitching the Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui as a stitchalong project. This week, I am stitching the berries on the front panel.  See the end of this post for all the information you’ll need to join in!

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

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HOW TO STITCH THE BEADED BERRIES

These gorgeous chunky little berries really make this project into something special – I’ve been looking forward to stitching these since I started making this etui! However, from the emails and comments on this blog that I’ve had over the past few weeks, these berries have caused people the most problems with this project out of all the elements, so I’ll try to address some of the issues with this blog post.

There is a slight problem with what these berries are called, for one thing. They are described as ‘strawberries’ in the Inspirations magazine’s instructions. But until I read that, I’d always thought they were raspberries. So, make your own mind up on that one!! I think that, with hindsight, the project itself was named after the ‘dangleys’ – there is definitely a strawberry on one of the cords hanging from the base of the heart. But these berries on the front panel are not like that!

This is what they start off as – little egg-shaped bits of dark red felt. I cut out 12, as eventually I’ll need twelve for the whole project, so I’ve bagged up the spares for later (when, hopefully, I’ll still be able to find them…). I had to adapt the shaping from the drawn outline of the design, as, on the drawing they have pointed tips, just like leaves.

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

Then I stab-stitched three of the shapes into position on the design, using dark red sewing cotton. In the magazine instructions, people are advised to use a kind of adhesive webbing (like Bondaweb) on the TOP surface of the felt, and then, after attaching the felt to the base fabric, work Oyster Stitch through the felt and the webbing. The reasoning being, I think, that that will cut down on the ‘fluff’ of the felt getting drawn up through the Oyster stitches. But people have been telling me that that doesn’t work, and it just makes it really difficult to work the stitches through the almost ‘sticky’ layer of the webbing. I think that’s a rather strange use of a webbing fabric, and unnecessary, so I didn’t use it!

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

The surface texture of the berries is achieved by working Oyster Stitch with a bead added. I used size 11 Mill Hill seed beads 42012 dark red (substitute) while working the Oyster stitch all over the felt shapes with two strands of Silk ‘n’ Color 1055 dark red (substitute). This is a really good use of a stitch with beads added – it makes them look just like…..RASPBERRIES, NOT STRAWBERRIES!!

Mary Corbet has a video tutorial for Oyster stitch here.

How to do Oyster stitch

The only thing that I would change in her tutorial is that when making the first loop (that looks like a Twisted chain stitch), I wouldn’t try to do it in a ‘scooping motion’ with the needle – I do it in two stages, as a stabbed stitch, taking the needle to the back, and then bringing it up exactly where I want it to be and making a sort of twisted chain stitch. ‘Scooping’ the needle on the fabric at this point, when there is felt padding on the top of the fabric to get through as well means that you wouldn’t be able to take a very small ‘bite’ of the fabric, so your Oyster stitches would end up being too large for this berry. You need to make five complete stitches in a row down the length of the centre of the berry, so each Oyster stitch needs to be about 3/16 of an inch long in total to fit five in. That can only be achieved by stab stitching the first twisted chain stitch shape, IMO! That’s the secret to getting these small textural stitches to fill the space properly.

You also need to remember to thread the bead on before you start each stitch, and then after making the first twisted chain stitch shape, push the bead up to the top of the stitch with your needle, just about to the point where you are going to take the needle behind the loop from right to left, underneath where the bead now sits. This will make the bead sit high on the completed stitch. Then make the final ‘chain stitch’ shape around the outside of the twisted chain stitch and bead combination, and catch that loop down to finish the Oyster Stitch.

With the centre berry, I did the stitches as the instructions recommended – a row of five down the centre, then three each side at the edges (left side first), then filled in the spaces in between with more stitches. It came out like this:

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

With the berry on the left, I altered that slightly, and worked the row of three down the right hand edge first, then the centre row, then the left hand row, to see if it made it any easier to get the needle under the loops when completing the stitches, but it didn’t make much difference to the ease of completion, and I felt that this berry ended up looking too ‘regimented’, with the beads in obvious rows.

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

So, with the berry on the right, I started filling in from the top of the berry, not doing any of it in rows, but just sort of ‘flood filling’ with stitches. Out of the three techniques, I think I like the centre berry the best, although it was tricky to do.

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

HOW TO STITCH THE NEEDLELACE SEPALS FOR THE BERRIES

Each berry has three sepals made from needlewoven picots. One of my blog readers, called Jeanette, has given me a tip which would have made stitching these a lot easier – she said to fix a plastic A4 pocket tightly up to the base of the berry, and temporarily tape the plastic to the edge of your hoop before putting in the ‘locating pin’ for each picot, so that when you are stitching the picots, the needle has a shiny base to slide across, instead of the base fabric and surrounding stitches, which can easily get caught in your needle.

Another blog reader said that she had so much trouble stitching the picots *after* the berries, that she unpicked the berries, and then started again, stitching the picots first, and then re-stitching the berries! So, that’s another option.

This is Mary Corbet’s really good video on how to make the picots.

How to stitch a Needlewoven picot

I stitched mine using one strand of Anchor 268 Dark green. I used a dressmaking pin as a locating pin to set the length of the picot.

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

With the centre berry, I found that once I’d worked the picots, the berry looked as if it was ‘floating’, as the design drawing didn’t have a stem to that berry. So I stitched one in the same style as the other two berries, but it was tricky to do after the picots had been stitched as they got in the way, and it looks a bit obvious now, I think.

Each berry has four Lazy daisy stitches worked underneath the needlewoven picots to give depth (make sure you stitch these after the picots, or you’ll keep catching your needle in them as you weave the picots), with one stitch in copper thread added too to give highlights. Then the picots are stitched down with a one strand of the same shade of green, with a bit of a twist to each one (not flat to the fabric). That bit made a lot of difference to the finished look.

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

So, here’s my finished berries:

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

I’m really pleased with how these RASPBERRIES turned out!

THE COMPLETED FRONT PANEL

This is the panel, now it is completely stitched (except for the Dorset button, which will go in the space in the centre, once it’s all been assembled). Although I’ve had to fiddle with several design elements, I’m pleased with this. The back panel should be easy to do now, and a lot quicker, as it repeats many elements from this front one. I’m also pleased, on the whole, with my thread substitutions, despite some of the green shades looking too similar to each other. Mostly, this panel has been stitched with Anchor stranded cotton thread. The carnation flower on the left doesn’t look quite so out of position now that more embroidery around it distracts the  eye somewhat. But it is still in the wrong place, due to a badly drawn design, and I wish I’d noticed before I traced it like that!

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

Seen sideways on, you can appreciate the texture of this piece of embroidery, which I love  🙂

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

NOW IT’S OVER TO YOU!

I’d love to see pictures of your embroidered panels, so please send your images to janet@janetgranger.co.uk , before 11th April 2018. That’s not long!!

I’d really like next week’s blog post to feature some pictures of your Strawberry Fayre panels, even if you haven’t completed them yet! Just send me a clear image of the whole panel, or just a detail, or an angled side view. Images need to be in .jpg format, well lit and in focus, and as large as possible, file-size-wise, please! Please bear in mind that any images sent in might be used by me on Facebook or other social media. I’m sure other people would love to see your stitching  🙂  I’ll try to use as many as possible……

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~~~INFORMATION~~~

The Strawberry Fayre design, plus the complete list of materials, appears in Inspirations magazine number 95The publishers do sell a full materials pack  (not including the mother of pearl ruler though!), but it’s rather expensive, so if you can use your stash, and just fill in with bits and pieces, then so much the better! The magazine is published in Australia – if you live in the UK, as I do, it is cheaper to buy a back copy from Manor House Magazines, and save a lot on the shipping. 

To read about this project stitchalong from the beginning, start here. The post about which FABRIC to use is here. The post about the THREAD SUBSTITUTIONS that I made, plus WHERE TO BUY the threads and beads, etc., is here.

To look up all the posts in this series in the sidebar, see under the CATEGORIES list, under: Embroidery / Full size (others’ designs) / Strawberry Fayre heart etui, or use the SEARCH BOX at the top of the blog, and search for ‘Strawberry Fayre’ to get a list of all the posts (but it’s in reverse order, sorry!).

I’d be interested to see images of how your project is progressing – please email large, clear, well-focused images to mail@janetgranger.co.uk  Please bear in mind that any images sent may be used in this blog and/or social media such as Facebook or Pinterest.

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Are you interested in doll’s houses and stitching? Then why not visit my website, where you can buy doll’s house needlepoint kits to make all kinds of soft furnishings for one-twelfth scale dollhouses. There are over 280 kits to choose from, plus chart packs, fabric project packs, tutorials, and lots of eye candy to inspire you! Kits are available on 18 and 22 count canvas, 28 and 32 count evenweave, and 32 and 40 count silk gauze, so there’s something for everyone – from beginners to experts.

As a special offer for new customers on my website, use the code FIRST TIME 10 at the checkout to receive 10% off your first order!

Dollhouse needlepoint kits

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Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui 15: the beaded forget-me-nots

I am currently stitching the Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui as a stitchalong project. This week, I’m stitching the beaded forget-me-not flowers. See the end of this post for all the information you’ll need to join in!

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

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HOW TO MAKE THE BEADED FORGET-ME-NOTS

I’ve been looking forward to stitching these cute little beaded forget-me-not flowers, as I love beads used with embroidery.

You’ll need to look at page 59 of the Inspirations magazine issue 95 for the diagrams about exactly how to do these – I tried to take photos of this process, but I didn’t have enough hands!!!

Before you start to make the beaded flowers, stitch the leaves, as it’s easier to do now, than after the flowers are in place (as is suggested in the instructions) – the leaves are simply individual Lazy daisy stitches in one strand of Anchor green 265 substitute.

The beaded forget-me-nots near the centre of the panel are what are referred to as ‘large’ sprays of flowers. These aren’t really ‘large’ in any sense of the word, but they are larger than the ‘small’ ones, if you see what I mean! The large ones use number 11 seed beads, and the small ones use tiny little number 15s. The large ones are placed near the centre of the panel. There are six of those, and ten of the small flowers, nearer to the  top of the panel.

These are some of the ‘large’ ones, using two shades of blue, once completed:

CHOOSE THE CATEGORY FOR THIS POST, and  EDIT the permalink, then delete this line! >>>>>>>>>>>> START I am currently stitching the Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui as a stitchalong project. See the end of this post for all the information you'll need to join in! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~  ***  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~  ***  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~INFORMATION~~~ The Strawberry Fayre design, plus the complete list of materials, appears in Inspirations magazine number 95. The publishers do sell a full materials pack  (not including the mother of pearl ruler though!), but it's rather expensive, so if you can use your stash, and just fill in with bits and pieces, then so much the better! The magazine is published in Australia - if you live in the UK, as I do, it is cheaper to buy a back copy from Manor House Magazines, and save a lot on the shipping.  To read about this project stitchalong from the beginning, start here. The post about which FABRIC to use is here. The post about the THREAD SUBSTITUTIONS that I made, plus WHERE TO BUY the threads and beads, etc., is here. To look up all the posts in this series in the sidebar, see under the CATEGORIES list, under: Embroidery / Full size (others’ designs) / Strawberry Fayre heart etui, or use the SEARCH BOX at the top of the blog, and search for 'Strawberry Fayre' to get a list of all the posts (but it's in reverse order, sorry!). ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Are you interested in doll's houses and stitching? Then why not visit my website, where you can buy doll's house needlepoint kits to make all kinds of soft furnishings for one-twelfth scale dollhouses. There are over 280 kits to choose from, plus chart packs, fabric project packs, tutorials, and lots of eye candy to inspire you! Kits are available on 18 and 22 count canvas, 28 and 32 count evenweave, and 32 and 40 count silk gauze, so there's something for everyone - from beginners to experts. As a special offer for new customers on my website, use the code FIRST TIME 10 at the checkout to receive 10% off your first order!

I had to substitute almost all the beads from the supplies list in the magazine, as I couldn’t find the Matsuno bead brand anywhere, that were actually in stock. In the end, I used two shades of blue (AB Delica shade SB0063 and SB0243 beads, both bought from Spellbound Beads) plus a gold size 11 bead for the ‘large’ flowers, and a blue  size 15 shade 353 plus a size 15 gold bead for the ‘small’ flowers. The blue shades looked virtually identical in the packets, but they do look different once stitched onto the fabric.

This is where the large flowers are used, on the panel:

The flowers are made by threading six blue beads onto fine thread (I used one strand of pale gold silk, as I wanted it to highlight the gold of the centre bead, but with hindsight I think a medium blue silk would have been better), using a betweens needle #10. Don’t knot the end of the thread first. Just hold the free end in your left hand close to your chest, with the beads on the thread held straight out in front of you. Then thread the needle through the first three beads again, to make a loop (easier said than done…). Resting all six beads on the index finger of your left hand while you do this helps. A bit. But not much.

Still holding the loose end of thread in your left hand, thread on a gold bead, and take the needle through the sixth bead, in the direction of the first bead on the ring, so that when you pull the thread tight, it should make a ring of beads, with the gold bead sitting in the middle of a ring of blue beads. Hopefully, the two thread ends are now close together between the sixth bead and the first bead. You can now tie a knot in the thread, place the beaded flower on your fabric, and use the thread end with the needle on to attach the flower to your fabric. Re-thread the needle with the second thread, and use that thread to couch down in between each of the blue beads, holding the ring in place neatly on the fabric. At this point, if your ‘flower’ didn’t look much like a flower, you can manipulate the beads a bit to pull them into shape.

Honestly, it’s easier to do than to describe!!

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

I found these quite time-consuming to do, but they really lift the design, once they’re done. The difference in size of the two types of flowers is subtle, but very pretty, and a typical Carolyn Pearce design feature!

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

Next week, I’ll be doing the berries at the base of the panel. How’s your stitching going?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~  ***  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~

~~~INFORMATION~~~

The Strawberry Fayre design, plus the complete list of materials, appears in Inspirations magazine number 95The publishers do sell a full materials pack  (not including the mother of pearl ruler though!), but it’s rather expensive, so if you can use your stash, and just fill in with bits and pieces, then so much the better! The magazine is published in Australia – if you live in the UK, as I do, it is cheaper to buy a back copy from Manor House Magazines, and save a lot on the shipping. 

To read about this project stitchalong from the beginning, start here. The post about which FABRIC to use is here. The post about the THREAD SUBSTITUTIONS that I made, plus WHERE TO BUY the threads and beads, etc., is here.

To look up all the posts in this series in the sidebar, see under the CATEGORIES list, under: Embroidery / Full size (others’ designs) / Strawberry Fayre heart etui, or use the SEARCH BOX at the top of the blog, and search for ‘Strawberry Fayre’ to get a list of all the posts (but it’s in reverse order, sorry!).

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Are you interested in doll’s houses and stitching? Then why not visit my website, where you can buy doll’s house needlepoint kits to make all kinds of soft furnishings for one-twelfth scale dollhouses. There are over 280 kits to choose from, plus chart packs, fabric project packs, tutorials, and lots of eye candy to inspire you! Kits are available on 18 and 22 count canvas, 28 and 32 count evenweave, and 32 and 40 count silk gauze, so there’s something for everyone – from beginners to experts.

As a special offer for new customers on my website, use the code FIRST TIME 10 at the checkout to receive 10% off your first order!

Dollhouse needlepoint kits

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui 13: small pink flowers on the front panel

I am currently stitching the Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui as a stitchalong project. This week I’m focussing on the small pink flowers and leaves at the top of the front heart panel. See the end of this post for all the information you’ll need to join in!

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

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HOW TO STITCH THE SMALL PINK FLOWERS

This week I’ve actually been stitching with a thread shade that isn’t green! I was getting a bit bored with that!

These little pink flowers are on either side of the front panel, at the top. The instructions in the magazine say to use a variegated thread, and cut out just the lighter parts to use for this flower, but I’ve substituted with Anchor 73 solid pale pink for them instead.

I started each petal with one strand, making one Lazy daisy stitch on the far left hand edge of a petal to make a nicely rounded left hand curve, then I filled in all the rest of the petal with Blanket stitches. At the right hand edge I took the thread to the back, then started the next petal with a Lazy daisy stitch again, as that makes for a neater outline all the way round the flower.

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

Then I stitched an outer line with Coral stitch in a slightly darker shade of pink (Anchor 50 substitute). The shades I’ve used for these two pinks on this flower are reversed from what I listed in the original Threads list, as I found that the colour I’d chosen for the centre of the flower was too dark, so I swopped it round with the outlining colour.

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

The instructions say to fill the centre area with both Colonial knots and French knots, but I can never see the difference, so I just did French knots, in two shades (House of Embroidery Pale Lemon from my stash, so I don’t know what the shade number is (sorry!),  and Gentle Art 0460 Grecian Gold substitute), using one strand of the HoE and two strands of the GA thread, with two wraps of the needle each time. Knots need a sharp needle to be successful – I used a #9 Sharp for these.

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

HOW TO STITCH THE LEAVES NEAR THE SMALL PINK FLOWERS

The three leaves near each of the pink flowers have centre fillings where two are the same, and one is different, on each side. These leaves are tiny anyway, so it does seem a bit of a waste to do tiddly little filling stitches that can hardly be seen, but here we go anyway…..

The centre leaf is in Vandyke stitch (previously used as a filling on the lily flower) with one strand of Anchor 267 substitute, and the leaves either side are stitched in Chained feather stitch with one strand of Anchor 268 substitute. Chained feather stitch is like a cross between Lazy daisy stitch and Fly stitch. It’s easy to do, and makes a nice alternative filling for leaves – I just found it too small to be seen properly once the leaf had been outlined, which all three leaves are, eventually.

Sew and So has a short video on how to do this stitch.

How to do Chained Feather Stitch

 

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

The outlining was done in a deep olive green thread from Oliver Twists (no. 004 substitute) using Stem stitch , which is a variegated thread, so my leaves had more visual interest than the original suggested thread. Each of these leaves is barely 1/2 an inch long, so although cute, I do think there’s too much detail in there.

If you don’t want to do all this tiny stitching, you might choose to just fill them in with Satin stitch, or French knots used as a filling, or even Seed stitch filling, and then outline them with the Stem stitch – it would definitely be quicker!

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

So, although I haven’t had much time for stitching this week, I’m pleased that I’ve been able to do some stitching that isn’t using green, at least for part of the time! And the panel is starting to fill up now, which is good. Next week, I’m hoping to get the primrose at the base of the heart done, which should be good, as I love stitching with yellow.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~  ***  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~

~~~INFORMATION~~~

The Strawberry Fayre design, plus the complete list of materials, appears in Inspirations magazine number 95The publishers do sell a full materials pack  (not including the mother of pearl ruler though!), but it’s rather expensive, so if you can use your stash, and just fill in with bits and pieces, then so much the better! The magazine is published in Australia – if you live in the UK, as I do, it is cheaper to buy a back copy from Manor House Magazines, and save a lot on the shipping. 

To read about this project stitchalong from the beginning, start here. The post about which FABRIC to use is here. The post about the THREAD SUBSTITUTIONS that I made, plus WHERE TO BUY the threads and beads, etc., is here.

To look up all the posts in this series in the sidebar, see under the CATEGORIES list, under: Embroidery / Full size (others’ designs) / Strawberry Fayre heart etui, or use the SEARCH BOX at the top of the blog, and search for ‘Strawberry Fayre’ to get a list of all the posts (but it’s in reverse order, sorry!).

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Are you interested in doll’s houses and stitching? Then why not visit my website, where you can buy doll’s house needlepoint kits to make all kinds of soft furnishings for one-twelfth scale dollhouses. There are over 280 kits to choose from, plus chart packs, fabric project packs, tutorials, and lots of eye candy to inspire you! Kits are available on 18 and 22 count canvas, 28 and 32 count evenweave, and 32 and 40 count silk gauze, so there’s something for everyone – from beginners to experts.

As a special offer for new customers on my website, use the code FIRST TIME 10 at the checkout to receive 10% off your first order!

Dollhouse needlepoint kits

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui 10: stitching the lily on the right

I am currently stitching the Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui as a stitchalong project. See the end of this post for all the information you’ll need to join in!

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This week I have been stitching the large lily flower on the right hand side of the front heart panel.

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

CHANGES TO THE THREADS USED

If you are stitching this along with me, using my substitute list of threads, then you need to be aware that I am already deviating from the list! I found that this flower needed more pinks, and fewer orangey-pinks (and I hate orange with pink anyway, so I can hardly bring myself to stitch with orange and pink together!).

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE?

Several people have mentioned that they aren’t stitching this project at the same speed as me – that’s fine though! Some people have stitched waaaay ahead of me already, and some people don’t have the time at the moment to keep up with what I’m doing. Just do it at your own pace, really, and check out my blog posts when you want to read how I did things. As I said at the beginning, this is supposed to be fun!

STITCHING THE LILY PETALS

The lily flower is the large pink one on the right of the front panel. The first pair of petals at the top of the flower are stitched in Vandyke stitch, using two strands of Anchor 55 substitute, and a tapestry needle (I used a size 26). You need a needle with a blunt tip for this stitch, so that you don’t pierce the fabric when you take the scooping stitch from right to left. See this video for Vandyke Stitch from Mary Corbet’s Needle ‘N Thread website for how to do the stitch.

How to do vandyke stitch

When it’s completed, it looks like a row of chain stitches with lines out each side. It’s a simple and quick stitch to do. Although I used two strands, I think it might have looked better with just one.

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

The next pair of petals are first covered with Satin stitch using two strands of Anchor 62 substitute and a betweens needle, ‘worked down the length of the petal’ as the instructions said, which I took to mean like this:

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

Then, five Fly stitches are worked over the top of the Satin stitch, adding a size 15 bead (1606 Dyed semi-transparent rose, from Spellbound Beads) each time, just before you complete the vertical tying down stitch. I used a paler bead than the design calls for, as I wanted a more subtle look.

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

The third pair of petals also are covered with Satin stitch, but this time the direction of the stitches follows the curve of the petal. As this is quite a sharp angle at times, I found I needed to make four or five ‘compensation stitches’ (three quarters the width, rather than the whole width) on each petal, to fill in on the wider curves.

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

Then the pretty bit – Latttice couching on top of the Satin stitch, with two strands of Anchor 77 substitute in one direction, and one strand of the metallic copper in the other direction, held down with one strand of Anchor 62 pink.  To do this neatly, it helps to place the threads that cross over at the most crucial point *first*, and then work out from there – on these petals, that’s the innermost part of the tight inner curves, where the lattice threads only just touch. And make sure that the angles of the couching threads mirror each other, as far as possible, on each side. This is where I noticed that the design was badly drawn (again), and the inner curve of these two petals varies on either side.

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

With the next part, I hit a problem. The Instructions call for Cable Plait stitch, but when I read up on how to do it in the magazine, it didn’t seem as if that was going to work, as it is a kind of wide braided stitch, and the area to be covered is just a line, and a thin line at that. So, I decided to use Coral stitch instead, which kind of looks the same, but is far easier to do, and fits the space!

This is how to do Coral Stitch.

How to do Coral stitch

I used a darker pink than the instructions said to use, as I felt my flower was becoming too insipid (Anchor 1028 substitute). At this point, I also filled in, with the metallic copper using Straight stitch, on the upper petals.

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

STITCHING THE CALYX

The calyx is stitched in just two colours: Anchor 265 substitute first, by outlining in Split stitch in one strand, then padding using Chain stitches laid head to tail within the Split stitch outline, and then covering all of that with Satin stitch in one strand. Then Lattice couching, tying down threads and outlining all in Oliver Twists Fine Cotton, shade 004 substitute. I was more pleased with how this calyx turned out than I was for the one for the carnation flower.

STITCHING THE LARGE CENTRE STAMEN

The centre large stamen is supposed to be made from looped bullion knots. For these, you need a Milliners needle (but not a really long one, as that makes the bullions more difficult to complete) – these are almost the same diameter from eye to point, so they are really good for making even, tightly wrapped bullions. It helps to stitch each bullion, then finish off your thread, and start again for the next one. That seems unnecessary, until one of them goes wrong…..you don’t want the previous bullion thread to not be anchored properly on the back of your work in that case, so it’s worth working each one individually. Note: these bullions are looonngg!! Practice first, so that you can make them neatly. They need to stand proud of the fabric, in a small loop, so the ‘bite’ of fabric that you take needs to be small. Also, remove the fabric from the hoop while you make these bullions, as it helps to be able to manipulate the fabric a bit while you push the needle upwards while you wrap the thread around the needle. Mary Corbet has a good written description, and then a video tutorial, here on her Needle ‘N Thread website.

However….I absolutely LOATHE doing bullion knots. I have a phobia about maggots, and to me, bullions look just like maggots. So, I decided to do the centre stamen like this: I stitched one chain stitch at the very top of the lily in Anchor 55 substitute, then four loose Fly stitches in a line above it, quite tightly placed above the previous stitches, curving to the left. Then I whipped the outside edges of the line of stitches with a pale pink Anchor 73, to make it all look a bit more solid. Much easier, and less maggot-like!!

The remaining stamens are in Pistil stitch (like a French knot on a stick), using the metallic copper thread. Mary Corbet has a good tutorial here.

Carolyn Pearce Strawberry Fayre heart etui

That’s it! Finished the lily! How did your one go?

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~~~INFORMATION~~~

The Strawberry Fayre design, plus the complete list of materials, appears in Inspirations magazine number 95The publishers do sell a full materials pack  (not including the mother of pearl ruler though!), but it’s rather expensive, so if you can use your stash, and just fill in with bits and pieces, then so much the better! The magazine is published in Australia – if you live in the UK, as I do, it is cheaper to buy a back copy from Manor House Magazines, and save a lot on the shipping. 

To read about this project stitchalong from the beginning, start here. The post about which FABRIC to use is here. The post about the THREAD SUBSTITUTIONS that I made, plus WHERE TO BUY the threads and beads, etc., is here.

To look up all the posts in this series in the sidebar, see under the CATEGORIES list, under: Embroidery / Full size (others’ designs) / Strawberry Fayre heart etui, or use the SEARCH BOX at the top of the blog, and search for ‘Strawberry Fayre’ to get a list of all the posts (but it’s in reverse order, sorry!).

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Are you interested in doll’s houses and stitching? Then why not visit my website, where you can buy doll’s house needlepoint kits to make all kinds of soft furnishings for one-twelfth scale dollhouses. There are over 280 kits to choose from, plus chart packs, fabric project packs, tutorials, and lots of eye candy to inspire you! Kits are available on 18 and 22 count canvas, 28 and 32 count evenweave, and 32 and 40 count silk gauze, so there’s something for everyone – from beginners to experts.

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Dollhouse needlepoint kits