Victorian Pincushion on spindle stand: 7 – assembling the ‘strawberry’

The little emery ‘strawberry’ is the final part that I need to stitch as part of the Victorian Pincushion on a spindle stand project that I am making from the Victoria sampler chart  booklet.

Victorian pincushion embroidery by Victoria Sampler

This is a pretty little ‘small’ that didn’t take long to stitch. To make it up into the actual strawberry, I first trimmed the fabric to within a centimetre of the running stitch outline round the embroidery. Then I folded the fabric in half and stitched a backstitch line just inside the running stitch (so that I didn’t need to bother removing the running stitches later), to make the fabric into a cone.

Embroidered emery strawberry

Next, I turned it right side out, and ran a line of running stitches around the top edge using number 12 Perle thread.

Embroidered emery strawberry

I lightly stuffed the shape with wadding (not emery powder, as my strawberry is only going to be decorative!). I pulled up the ends of the thread, turning in the seam allowance at the same time, and knotted the thread to make the strawberry shape.

Embroidered emery strawberry

It looked a bit messy at this stage, but the embroidery will cover that up, hopefully!

Embroidered emery strawberry

I then stitched a few long straight stitches in dark green silk around the top of the strawberry, and then added three little silk ribbong bows in dark green. Finally, I added a central loop in variegated silk ribbon and tied a small bow at the top, to hang the strawberry by, on the pincushion spindle.

Embroidered emery strawberry

And this is it finished:

Embroidered emery strawberry

So, my lovely Victorian Pincushion etui set is now complete! I am really pleased with this. It will look lovely in my glass display cabinet with all my other embroidery, but will also be useful when I’m doing even more embroidery.

Embroidered Victorian pincushion on spindle stand by Victoria SamplerThis is such an unusual project from Thea Dueck of Victoria Sampler. Take a look at her website to see lots of other unusual and creative embroidery projects.

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Victorian Pincushion on spindle stand: 6 – stitching the ‘strawberry’

This week  I’ve stitched the embroidery for the little ‘strawberry’ that will hang from the Victorian Pincushion spindle stand with the  needlebook. Here’s the front of the chart booklet, to show you what I mean:

Victorian Pincushion embroidery

It’s the tiny thing hanging down on the left! It’s supposed to contain emery powder, to help clean needles, but I have tried making one of these before with emery powder in, and it is very messy black stuff that gets everywhere. So, as this is really just a decorative ‘small’, I’m going to make mine just stuffed with wadding instead, I think.

The embroidery design is a motif taken from the top circular design, and it doesn’t take long to stitch two repetitions:

Strawberry emery design

I just need to stitch it into a cone shape and stuff it now, and this project will be finished.

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Victorian Pincushion on spindle stand: 4 – stitching the needlebook

I’m currently stitching this gorgeous pincushion on a wooden base from a Victoria Sampler chart booklet in my stash. Having stitched the pincushion itself, I’m now stitching the smalls – starting with the little needlebook.

Victorian pincushion embroidery by Victoria Sampler

This pretty needlebook takes motifs from the pincushion itself, as well as a Bargello wave along the bottom. Three little square eyelets at the top will become the method of making the ‘pages’ of the needlebook hold together – I’ll be threading ribbon through those at the final stage.

This didn’t take long to do, and I was quite pleased with how it turned out…..until I realised just as I was finishing the stitching that I had miscounted somehow, and made it eight fabric threads too long! I think it was when I was working out the placement of the little pearl beads.

Not being a perfectionist, rather than unpick loads and do it correctly, I decided to make my needlebook just a bit longer than the Victoria sampler one! It just means that I have to make sure the reverse side of the needlebook is adapted to be exactly the same shape as this front panel, and adjust the shaping when I assemble it.

Victoria Sampler embroidery needlebook

It was easy to make the adjustment for the extra length on the reverse side, as there is a lot of ‘blank space’ between the eyelets and the main design.

Victoria Sampler embroidery needlebook

Shhh!! No-one will notice…..

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Victorian pincushion on spindle stand: 3 – assembling the pincushion

I’m currently stitching this gorgeous pincushion on a wooden base from a Victoria Sampler chart booklet in my stash. I’m up to the part where I need to assemble the stitching to make the actual pincushion.

Victorian pincushion embroidery by Victoria Sampler

This is my completed pincushion stitching, before I started to make it into the pincushion.

Victoria Sampler ribbon embroidery beaded pincushion

To make the pincushion pad, I rolled a strip of 2 ounce wadding into a ‘cinnamon bun’ shape, and stitched a few tacking stitches over the end of the  strip to stop it from unravelling. I made a stiff card base for the pincushion, a little bit smaller than the diameter of the wooden circular base, and made a hole in the centre of the card.

Victorian pincushion by Victoria Sampler

Then I trimmed the fabric to within an inch of the embroidery, and made a line of running stitches round the edge, 1cm in, with strong quilting thread. I placed the wadding shape on the card, and then the embroidery on top, and pulled up the running stitched line to gather the fabric onto the dome of wadding.

Then I laced back and forth across the card circle’s base, to pull the fabric tightly to the circular shape.

Next, I used the Perle 12 mauve thread and, following the tacked lines on the circle, I pulled the thread up through the centre hole of the card, wadding and embroidery in the centre, and down over the edge of the shape, six times, to make the divisions on the pincushion, finally tying off securely underneath. Then I removed the tacking stitches.

Lastly, I stuck the pincushion to the wooden circular base, making sure it was centred.

Victorian pincushion by Victoria Sampler

To make the edge look neat where the pincushion joins the wooden base, I made a thick cord using lots of the Perle 12 mauve thread. Tilting the pincushion so that I could see what I was doing, I stuck the cord around the edge, a little at a time, using tacky PVA glue, tucking in the last bit to make it look like one continuous cord (I glued the very end bit first, before trimming, so that it didn’t suddenly unravel when cut!).

Victorian pincushion by Victoria Sampler

Ta-da!! One very successful pincushion on a spindle base!! I used vintage cotton reels from a sewing box that I bought in an antique shop to fill the spindles around the base, using shades picked from the embroidery colours I’d used.

Victorian pincushion by Victoria Sampler

Lovely, isn’t it? Now I need to make the strawberry emery and needlebook that go with this.

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