Where Stitchers Gather etui by Victoria Sampler: 6 – stitching the smalls

I’ve finished stitching the main pocket of the ‘Where Stitchers Gather‘ etui  by Thea Dueck of Victoria Sampler now, and I’ve really enjoyed stitching it.

Where Stitchers gather embroidered etui pocket

Now it’s time to make the three smalls, to go inside it.

I first stitched all the designs on one piece of fabric, carefully measuring out the spacing.

Smalls for Where Stitchers gather embroidered etui

I completed the scissor fob first, by gathering the stitched fabric circle over a round piece of mount board (2mm thick), padded a bit with a layer of thin wadding. Then I did the same with a second mount board circle, using the deep red silk the same as I’d used for the lining of the etui pocket. I stuck them back to back, and slip-stitched around the edges to make one disc. Then I made a very thin cord out of some DMC Perle 12 as shown below, and tried it first around the shape to make sure it would fit, and leave enough to frizz out the ends last, to make a tassel. I stuck the cord around the edge very carefully, a bit at a time, using PVA glue.

Scissor fob for Where Stitchers gather embroidered etui

Here’s the completed scissor fob, attached to my cute little rose gold scissors.

Scissor fob for Where Stitchers gather embroidered etui

This is the back, showing the deep red silk side.

Scissor fob for Where Stitchers gather embroidered etui

I made the scissor pocket in a similar way, using stiff interlining instead of the mount board though, so that the scissor pocket is soft to hold. I laced the two sides together through the long back stitches that I’d stitched round the very edge of each piece.

Scissors pocket for Where Stitchers gather embroidered etui

Lastly, I made the needlebook. This, too, is soft, and not stretched over mount board, but stiff interlining.

Needlebook for Where Stitchers gather embroidered etui

I’d half thought to stitch the date on the back, but in the end, when I got to that stage, I forgot, so it’s blank!

Needlebook for Where Stitchers gather embroidered etui

The inside pages are made from doctor flannel, held in place up the centre with a line of running stitches.

Needlebook for Where Stitchers gather embroidered etui

Here’s the completed project, with all four pieces:

Smalls and Where Stitchers gather embroidered etui

It was a gorgeous project to stitch – not too simple, with a few challenging bits (the hardanger!!! Cutting those fabric threads!!), but also with some simple cross stitching so that most of it  was completed quite quickly.

Smalls and Where Stitchers gather embroidered etuiAs ever with projects by Thea from Victoria Sampler, the design was great, the instructions in the chart booklet were clear, and the accessories pack with the threads and beads was full of interesting things to work with. This is well worth stitching, and has the added bonus of being something useful when you’ve finished it, so you can get lasting enjoyment from using it every time you sit down to stitch.

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Where Stitchers Gather etui by Victoria Sampler: 5 – completing the stitching, and assembly of the etui pocket

I’ve almost finished this ‘Where Stitchers Gather‘ etui pocket by Thea Dueck of Victoria Sampler now, and I’ve really enjoyed stitching it.

Once the main panel was completed, I backstitched around the whole design with Perle 12 thread, over four threads. This will give me a clear outline for assembling the pocket later.

Cross stitch on Where stitchers gather etui by Victoria Sampler

This is the whole piece, before being assembled. You can see that some of the lettering faces up one way, and some down the other way – this is because when the pocket is wrapped around itself, some will be on the back of the pocket and some on the front, facing the other way. It will all make sense later!

Cross stitch on Where stitchers gather etui by Victoria Sampler

I fixed pieces of the maroon dupion silk in place with pieces of iron-on interlining. These go over the back of the drawn thread work and hardanger heart.

Assembly of Where stitchers gather etui by Victoria Sampler

It looks like this when it’s done:

Assembly of Where stitchers gather etui by Victoria Sampler

I trimmed the stitched piece to half an inch all round as a seam allowance, then cut pieces of dupion silk and thin wadding the same size.

Assembly of Where stitchers gather etui by Victoria Sampler

I ironed the seam allowance to the reverse of the stitching, and then ironed the dupion silk to have similar seam allowances, so that they were identical sizes. I lightly tacked the thin wadding in position on the back of the stitching and then slip-stitched the lining to the stitched front, wrong sides together, using the back stitched border as a guide. The bottom of the ‘sandwiched’ piece was folded up to make a pocket, and the top part makes a deep flap.

Assembly of Where stitchers gather etui by Victoria Sampler

Narrow sill ribbons are attached at the sides to keep the pocket closed when the ribbons are tied. This is the front:

Completed Where stitchers gather etui by Victoria Sampler

And this is the back:

Completed Where stitchers gather etui by Victoria Sampler

It’s quite a small pocket – about 5 by 7 inches – but large enough to keep the smalls and a few skeins of thread in.

Completed Where stitchers gather etui by Victoria Sampler

It would make a lovely project just as it is, to keep other things in, such as jewellery, but I want to keep going and stitch the smalls for it now  🙂

Completed Where stitchers gather etui by Victoria Sampler

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Where Stitchers Gather etui by Victoria Sampler: 4 – the cross stitch band and the bargello band

Once I got the scary hardanger section of this ‘Where Stitchers Gather‘ etui pocket by Thea Dueck of Victoria Sampler done, I was all fired up to get on with it!

I did all of this next section in two days.

There are two swans either side of the hardanger heart, and two little frogs among the bulrushes. Then there’s a band of cross stitch, and then some pretty white bargello stitching.

Cross stitch and bargello on Where stitchers gather etui by Victoria Sampler

As the theme of this pocket is ‘where stitchers gather’, it makes sense to feature some stitchers! Here they are, all sat around a long table, stitching on frames and hoops:

Cross stitch and bargello on Where stitchers gather etui by Victoria Sampler

I stitched all the people before stitching the tablecloth.

Cross stitch and bargello on Where stitchers gather etui by Victoria Sampler

Close up, you can see that this simple cross stitch variation makes a nice contrast to the more solid cross stitch of the women’s clothes.

Cross stitch and bargello on Where stitchers gather etui by Victoria Sampler

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Book review: Stumpwork and goldwork embroidery by Jane Nicholas

This book by Jane Nicholas, “Stumpwork and Goldwork Embroidery” is not new (it was published in 2010 in Australia), but it’s a fantastic book, and one of my favourites, so I thought I’d review it.

My copy is a high quality hardback, with 272 page, A4 size. If you’re familiar with the embroidery of Jane Nicholas, you’ll already know that any book of hers is produced to a really high standard, and the embroidery featured will be gorgeous! This book is no exception.

Jane has taken her inspiration from Turkish, Syrian and Persian tiles, and created some wonderful embroidery projects using both goldwork and stumpwork embroidery together – it’s a combination that I particularly like.

S & G 1

The book has 16 different projects in it, from simple little roundels and box lids, to more complex designs for experienced stitchers. As usual with Jane’s books, the instructions are very detailed, and the photos are to die for – really close-up images that show you exactly what you can make for yourself, when you follow Jane’s instructions.

Each project lists the materials needed, fabric needed, a pattern to trace off, shapes for any stumpwork elements, and then the instructions.

Finishing instructions are given in a separate section at the back of the book.

S & G 2

The final chapter of the book covers techniques used, the equipment you’ll need, and a stitch glossary. Although you’d probably need a bit of stitching experience already to get the most out of this book, the instructions are so good that if you are a confident beginner and are prepared to read through everything first, I think you’d be OK doing most of the projects in here. You’ll certainly be tempted!!

Although there are lists of materials needed for each project described, there are details at the back of the book of how to purchase kits for the projects as well, as Jane sells these from her own website. You’ll still need the book to work from, for the detailed instructions.

S & G 3

This project below is one that I’ve had my eye on ever since I bought this book when it first came out (OK, I know that was several years ago now, but a girl has to have a list of projects waiting to be done!). I’d probably make it as a box lid rather than a box insert, as it seems a waste to me to have all that embroidery INSIDE a box! But isn’t it lovely?

S & G 4

Jane has a very distinctive embroidery design style – it’s incredibly neat, and I’ve read that she is constantly unpicking stitches to make them perfect (wish I had that attitude!). These projects will appeal to you if you enjoy neatness. These are not the kind of ‘creative embroidery’ where you do your own thing very much. But if you want to make something that looks just like Jane’s version, you can’t go wrong with this book, as the instructions are so clear and detailed.

Usually, when I review books, there are one or two things that I mention as being ‘less good’ than the rest, but to be honest, with this book, there isn’t anything! Possibly the price is a little high, but then it’s a good quality book, and second hand copies are usually available on Amazon for around half the price of new copies if cost is an issue for you.

Jane has published about ten embroidery books so far, and they are all brilliant. Search online for her other books if this style of embroidery appeals to you 🙂

Title: Stumpwork and goldwork embroidery inspired by Turkish, Syrian and Persian tiles

Author: Jane Nicholas

Publisher: Sally Milner Publishing

ISBN
978 1  86351 409 5

Price: 22.00 GBP

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