Teeny Weeny Cross Stitch Cottage 3: It’s finished!

I’ve done all the stitching on my Teeny Weeny Cross Stitch Cottage by Sakoran now, and I’m up to the point where I need to assemble it. As with the rest of this project, the instructions in the booklet are very detailed.

The building is assembled by whip stitching through the back stitched outlines and pulling the shapes together. The roof was particularly fiddly to do, but looks good now! (I was quite prepared to throw it across the room at one point, though!!) The joins of the walls are oversewn through a two-block gap in the brown cross stitching, kind of ‘pinching’ the fabric together from the outside, and then oversewing across the unstitched Aida to make the white columns of stitching. Easier to do than to describe…..

Wadding isn’t included in the kit, but it’s easy to find some cotton wool to fill the little house with, and then stitch the base in place.

So, this is the little house now it’s completed:

 

 

Isn’t it lovely? It’s only about two and a half inches high – really small!

As I said earlier in this series, the instruction booklet for this project is really detailed. There are dozens of photos showing every stage, and clear charts too.

There’s a section at the back that explains how to do all the surface stitches that are needed, once the cross stitch has been done.

The DMC threads come pre-sorted, which is helpful. I did find, though, that with some colours I almost ran out, and with other colours (such as the white) there were yards left over. Here is the thread sorter when I’d finished the project, to show you how much was left over:

Also, I found the needles that were supplied with the kit to be a bit too big for 18 count Aida, so I changed them to smaller ones from my sewing box.

The instruction booklet is A5 size. This picture shows you just how tiny this cottage is! In the instructions, it’s suggested that the cottage would make a good tree decoration, with the addition of a hanging loop, and I might just do that.

And finally, for comparison, here is my new gingerbread cottage next to the Victoria Sampler Gingerbread Stitching House. Don’t they look sweet together?!

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Are you interested in doll’s houses and stitching? Then why not visit my website, where you can buy doll’s house needlepoint kits to make all kinds of soft furnishings for one-twelfth scale dollhouses. There are over 280 kits to choose from, plus chart packs, fabric project packs, tutorials, and lots of eye candy to inspire you! Kits are available on 18 and 22 count canvas, 28 and 32 count evenweave, and 32 and 40 count silk gauze, so there’s something for everyone – from beginners to experts.

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21 thoughts on “Teeny Weeny Cross Stitch Cottage 3: It’s finished!”

  1. I just figured out why it’s solid cross-stitch, rather than brown Aida: Lacing to cardboard for support would be an awful fiddle with those tiny pieces (I also only just realized HOW tiny!), and it needs the support of the extra stitching to maintain a flat surface once stuffed.
    That really is cute!

  2. Lovely. What thread did you use for the whip stitching? Was it included in the kit? Was the whip stitching used to make the white columns or before the pinching?

      1. So, it is all done in one go? ie. as you do the whip stitching you are creating the white columns?

  3. It’s so cute and, surprisingly, despite all the brown x-stitching, a fast project. Another thing I like about it is that it imitates ginger bread accurately without being gingerbread and without trying to look like gingerbread. It’s just that wonderful!

  4. Janet

    I have admired your Teen Weeny house, it is so cute. Are the patterns for purchase? If so, where may I find them?

    Thank you for bringing these miniatures to us.

    Marsha

    On Thu, Dec 14, 2017 at 8:01 AM, Janet Granger’s Blog wrote:

    > Janet Granger posted: “I’ve done all the stitching on my Teeny Weeny Cross > Stitch Cottage by Sakoran now, and I’m up to the point where I need to > assemble it. As with the rest of this project, the instructions in the > booklet are very detailed. The building is assembled by wh” >

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