Celtic Autumn in alternative colours – 1

This past weekend, I made a start on the Lavender and Lace Celtic Autumn design, in the alternative colours. I stitched all the hours I had available, and, including a couple of weekday evenings, I’ve managed 10 hours of stitching so far, and it now looks like this:

This is the Celtic Autumn design after 10 hours of stitching

I’m stitching it on Zweigart ‘Platinum’ 28 count linen evenweave from Sew and So, with DMC stranded cotton (two strands). There are 35 shades in this design altogether, so the shading is really subtle in places, plus gold thread (I’m using Petite Treasure Braid PB03), plus five shades of Mill Hill seed beads. It’s very tempting to add some beads now, ‘just to see how they’ll look’, but I mustn’t get tempted too much, as I’m stitching this with the fabric on a rectangular rotating frame, and adding beads now will mean that I can’t roll the fabric up properly later. When I get to the stage of adding all the beads, I’ll put the fabric onto a Q-Snap frame, which is gentler on beaded fabric.

Using 35 colours of DMC means that the shading in the design can be subtle

I’ve decided to count the hours this takes me to stitch, so that I’ve got a proper record of how long it takes – usually, I make a very rough estimate, but I want to be more precise with this one, as it’s a big project, and I want to know how much of my life I’ve sacrificed to get it done!!

The grid to help me track how many hours I stitch for

To make that simple, I designed a grid in Excel, and printed it out on one sheet of A4, and each time I spend 10 minutes on my stitching, I put a cross in one of the boxes. The grid is divided up into six boxes horizontally by ten boxes vertically. That equates to ten hours of ten-minute slots. I folded the A4 sheet so that only one grid box out of the twelve is showing, so that it’s small enough to clip it to the edge of my floor frame. So far, it’s proving really easy to keep track of how long it’s taking.

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13 thoughts on “Celtic Autumn in alternative colours – 1

  1. Mary Corbet

    Hi, Janet! The sampler is beautiful – and the colors are so very Autumn!

    I love your time-keeping idea! Sometimes, I use a stopwatch to clock time spent on a project. If only I could remember to turn it on and off consistently! I may have to adopt your time grid idea…. Thanks for the tip!

    -MC

    Reply
    1. Janet Granger Post author

      Thanks, I’m very pleased with the colours. I didn’t choose them, but I’ve got every confidence in the person who did – they’ve got a very good eye for colour. Some of the rust shades look virtually identical when held in the hand just as skeins – but once stitched, the differences become apparent.

      I’ve tried other methods for keeping track of how long my stitching takes me, but this one is so simple, that it seems to be working great so far 🙂

      Reply
  2. Sue H

    It’s coming along nicely Janet and the new colour scheme looks beautiful.

    I love your idea for keeping track of how long you actually stitch for.
    I’ve never really done that for my own stitching, I just make a note of when I start and when I finish and then guesstimate but may give your way a try on my next project, which I think is going to be Celtic Winter.

    Happy Stitching!
    Sue
    x

    Reply
  3. Julie

    I, too, love your time grid and will be putting it to use. I tried to figure out how long it would take to complete a project to determine if there is enough time between now and Xmas, counting stitches per ten minute time frame determined no way. I want to add your time grid info to the project biography!

    35 colors is a lot of needle changing! But the effect is stunning!

    Reply
    1. Janet Granger Post author

      I’m finding the grid very easy to use, now. I used to have a piece of paper and write, ’20 mins, 55 mins’, etc on it, and then every so often add them all up and write sub-totals, but it was all a bit tedious.

      35 colours *is* a lot of needle-changing – I’ve tried having a needle for each colour, but with such close shades there’s a chance I’d get a colour wrong at some point, and I hate unpicking….

      Reply
      1. Julie

        Janet, I have re-blogged this post of yours. I hope you don’t mind. If you do I can delete it. I also created a PDF of your grid idea and added it to my reference section. The idea ties into a previous post I had done about how much time we spend and need to value ourselves for. Feel free to use the PDF as an adjunct to this article, Janet. I think I’m going to keep a special time sheet just for unpicking! We can have a contest!

  4. Julie

    Reblogged this on Sight Sniffing and commented:
    Remember in a previous post I mentioned how interesting and worthwhile it is to track your time on projects. Janet Granger has come up with a brilliant method. I have followed her lead and created a pdf of her grid format. You’ll find it in the Reference section here.

    And look at her Celtic Autumn piece. 35 shades of autumn in the lettering!!! Incredible!

    Reply
  5. Julie

    Reblogged this on The Shop Sampler and commented:
    Remember in a previous post I mentioned how interesting and worthwhile it is to track your time on projects. Janet Granger has come up with a brilliant method. I have followed her lead and created a pdf of her grid format. You’ll find it in the Reference section here.

    And look at her Celtic Autumn piece. 35 shades of autumn in the lettering!!! Incredible!

    Reply
  6. Pingback: NOTICE | The Shop Sampler

  7. Dawn

    Love the colours you are using for the new colour scheme. The ten minute grid is simple but sounds so effective I will have to give it a try.
    When using a lot of colours I use a Pako Needle Organiser, saves a lot of time having to re-thread needles.

    Reply
  8. Carol

    This is lovely! I have had all four seasons of the Celtic lady patterns and now that the kids are grown, I think I’ll start on them. Where can I find the alternate colors for autumn? And winter? Just beautiful….

    Reply

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